Time Management Reading List

Time Management from the Inside Out
by Julie Morgenstern (2004; 2nd Edition)

Morgenstern’s book edges out David Allen’s Getting Things Done because Morgenstern’s book doesn’t require learning and executing a comprehensive time management system. Morgenstern includes sections to help you determine what’s holding you back from making better use of your time and tools for eliminating those bottleneck.

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168 Hours: You Have More Time Than You Think
by Laura Vanderkam (2010)

Vanderkam’s premise is in the title: You have plenty of time; you just aren’t using it right. Gently but directly, Vanderkam shows you where you time is and how to put it to use to build do the things that matter to you.

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The War of Art
by Steven Pressfield (2002)

If you have a big project to accomplish, buy Steven Pressfield’s The War of Art and keep it near you. Pressfield identifies the enemy of big projects—internal resistance—and shows you how to stay motivated and stick with large undertakings until they are complete. Although written with an eye towards creative undertakings like writing a book or a screenplay, The War of Art has essential lessons for any large
undertaking to help you reach a successful end.

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We Have Met the Enemy
by Daniel Akst (2011)

Daniel Akst’s book presents a lively and upbeat discussion about the challenge of exerting willpower in an age when temptations, time wasters, and tantalizing distractions are everywhere. Direct without being preachy, and honest without being depressing, Akst’s book frankly discusses ways to fight back against the endless array of choices and tempting time wasters that all too often prevent people from reaching
their objectives.

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Rapt: Attention and the Focused Life
by Winifred Gallagher (2009)

Winifred Gallagher decided to write this book after being diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer. Realizing that the disease would dominate her life unless she took steps to prevent it, Gallagher chose to battle her cancer but not let the disease occupy every waking moment of her thoughts. Rapt is a smart, thoughtful book about how our thoughts shape our life and is a vivid reminder that our mental
focus—under assault in the digital age—is one of our most prized possessions.

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Getting Things Done
by David Allen (2001)

No list of time management books is complete without David Allen’s Getting Things Done (GTD) on it. GTD is a time management system, so choose this book only if you are open to learning and implementing a comprehensive time management scheme. If you prefer more ala carte tools and tips, buy Julie Morgenstern’s Time Management from the Inside Out instead.

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First Things First
by Stephen Covey, Roger Merrill, and Rebecca Merrill (1994)

This is a classic time management book by Steven Covey and Roger and Rebecca Merrill. Written in Covey’s straightforward style, First Things First is filled with immediately usable time management tools.

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The Harvard Medical School Guide to a Good Night’s Sleep
by Lawrence Epstein (2006)

If you are tempted to save some time by skipping some sleep, think again. This book is packed with practical suggestions for improving your sleep, and will convince you to take your slumber much more seriously.

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Brain Rules
by John Medina

This is the single best book on getting the most out of your brain. Medina’s book makes the time management reading list because what good is time without a sharp mind to make use of it? Buy Medina’s book and learn how to optimize your amazing brain.

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Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers
by Robert Sapolsky (2004; 3rd Edition)

This book is about stress and is written by a preeminent Stanford professor of biology and neurology. Sapolsky’s book provides an accessible scientific overview of stress and stress coping strategies. Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers earns a spot on the time management reading list because where there are time pressures, stress and anxiety are never far behind.

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